Saline Valley Warm Springs – Death Valley, California

Nestled in the remote desert valley of Inyo County, California, Saline Valley Warm Springs is a hidden gem for those seeking natural hot springs, solitude, and an escape from the hustle and bustle of city life. Located on the edge of Death Valley National Park, this semi-permanent camp is a haven for soaking in warm pools surrounded by towering palm trees, grassy areas, and the stunning Inyo Mountains.

But getting to Saline Valley Warm Springs is no easy feat. The bumpy journey down dirt roads and narrow canyons requires a high clearance vehicle, good tires, and possibly a spare. Once you arrive, you’ll be rewarded with a unique and rustic experience, complete with pit toilets, communal fire pits, and possibly a few naked people enjoying the hot springs.

Whether you’re looking for a day trip or a longer retreat, Saline Valley Warm Springs is a special place that offers something for everyone, but it’s important to understand the rules and regulations set by the California Desert Protection Act, the Bureau of Land Management, and the National Park Service. In this article, we’ll explore the location and access, the natural wonders and amenities, and the tips and considerations for planning a visit to Saline Valley Warm Springs.

Exploring the Natural Wonders and Amenities at Saline Valley Warm Springs

Dirty bike Saline Valley Warm Springs, California
Dirty bike Saline Valley Warm Springs, California

Located at the edge of the sand dunes and just a few miles from the southern pass of Grapevine Canyon, Saline Valley Warm Springs offers a unique and majestic experience.

Hot Spring Pools with Optional Clothing

For travelers, there are three soaking options, each with a variety of escapes to suit your needs. Depending on the season, temperatures can range from 95 to 107°F.

The first two options are called “Lower Spring” and “Palm Spring Hot Springs,” respectively. These man-made hot spring tubs feature lovely rock detailing and showers to rinse off before bathing.

The “Upper Hot Springs” are the best option if you prefer undeveloped hot springs in order to become one with nature. This natural hot spring is located about two miles from Lower Spring and Palm Spring.

Whatever hot spring pool you choose, you will be greeted with some exotic views of the prestigious desert and an enthralling mountain range on the horizon.

The three pools at Saline Valley Hot Springs were added to Death Valley National Park in 1994. Having said that, the pools are open to everyone, and clothing is entirely optional.

It is critical to keep the area clean. Soakers, for example, must respect and preserve the site. Not only that, but burros and coyotes frequent the area, especially if trash is left out for rummaging.

The Saline Valley Warm Springs are a great place to relax and take in the beauty of the desert. The springs offer several different types of soaking pools and tubs, including several hot tubs and a large main pool. The area is also surrounded by grassy areas and palm trees, with a salt marsh nearby. The Timbisha Shoshone Tribe also maintains a communal fire pit in the area, making it a great place for a sunset gathering.

Sun Valley Camping Area

Sun Valley Camping Area
Sun Valley Camping Area

For those looking to explore the surrounding area, the Saline Valley Warm Springs offer a great starting point. From the springs, you can take a hike up the northern pass of Grapevine Canyon, or you can explore the wild springs in the valley. There are also several hot springs hidden in the area, making it a great place to explore and discover.

With breathtaking scenery and three premier hot spring pools to relax in, it can be difficult to leave the wondrous Saline Valley Hot Springs. If you can’t seem to tear yourself away, you’ll be relieved to know that camping is permitted for up to 30 days.

The Saline Valley Campground has no camping fees, but there are no amenities. However, camping is prohibited within 100 feet of the source springs. This campground, which is accessible via mountain dirt roads, is best accessed by 4WD vehicle. Cell phone service is most likely unavailable.

The vast open skies, inviting hot spring pools, and a community fire pit to unwind with friends and family (bring your own firewood!) are the highlights.

No matter what type of experience you’re looking for, Saline Valley Warm Springs is the right place. Whether you’re looking for a relaxing soak in natural hot springs, or you want to explore the wild springs in the area, the Saline Valley Warm Springs offer something for everyone. It’s a special place that’s sure to provide a great experience. So come check out the Saline Valley Warm Springs and enjoy the natural wonders and amenities it has to offer.

Finding and Getting to Saline Valley Warm Springs

Entry sign for Saline Valley Warm Springs, California
Entry sign for Saline Valley Warm Springs, California

The desert valley Saline Valley Warm Springs is located on the eastern edge of the Death Valley National Park and is accessible via Saline Valley Road – a dirt road that requires a high clearance vehicle and good tires. It’s not an easy journey – the road can have washboard sections, narrow canyons and bumpy sections. Plus, the road is remote – you might find yourself in the middle of nowhere if you have a flat tire!

But the journey is worth it – once you arrive in Saline Valley, you’ll find a beautiful desert valley with wild springs and an incredible view of the Inyo Mountains. The closest paved road is the Furnace Creek Road in the Owens Valley, which can be accessed from either the northern or southern entrance. However, the northern pass is the more direct route for recreation users as the southern pass is a longer, more winding route.

Be warned that Saline Valley Road is not suitable for travel in the winter months – the winter snows and storms can be strong and the wind can be fierce. When the weather is good, however, you’ll find the drive to Saline Valley Warm Springs to be an exhilarating experience. Just be sure to bring a spare tire and plenty of water, and you’ll be fine.

Once you arrive at Saline Valley Warm Springs, you’ll find a unique and beautiful oasis. The springs are a popular destination for recreation users, and you’ll find a landing strip, a chicken strip and plenty of opportunities for public nudity. In short, Saline Valley Warm Springs is an unforgettable experience – and one that you’ll never forget!

Understanding the Rules and Regulations of Saline Valley Warm Springs

If you’re planning a visit to the Saline Valley Warm Springs, you’ll want to familiarize yourself with the rules and regulations of the area. The California Desert Protection Act and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have put in place a management plan for the area that you’ll need to understand and adhere to during your visit.

The management plan for Saline Valley Warm Springs includes a few important things to keep in mind. First, the BLM requires all visitors to check in with the local ranger station before entering the area. This is to ensure that the park is kept safe and that visitors are aware of any current conditions. The ranger station will also provide you with the necessary permits for camping in the area.

The BLM also requires all visitors to go through the comment periods before making any changes to the camping area. This is to ensure that all park visitors are aware of any changes that may affect their camping experience. Additionally, the BLM has set up a semi-permanent camp in the area, and all visitors must pay a camping fee to use the area.

The BLM also has a few other rules and regulations in place for visitors to Saline Valley Warm Springs. For example, public nudity is not allowed in the area, and all roads into the area must remain closed when not in use. Additionally, all visitors should abide by the current conditions of the park and practice good camping etiquette.

Overall, understanding the rules and regulations of Saline Valley Warm Springs is essential for any visitor. By adhering to the BLM’s management plan and utilizing the comment periods, visitors can ensure that their camping experience is enjoyable and safe. Additionally, visitors should pay attention to the current conditions of the park and practice good camping etiquette.

Planning a Visit to Saline Valley Warm Springs: Tips and Things to Know

Soaking pool at Saline Valley Warm Springs, California
Soaking pool at Saline Valley Warm Springs, California

Are you looking for a place to escape the hustle and bustle of everyday life? Saline Valley Warm Springs is the perfect location for a day trip filled with adventure and relaxation. Located in Death Valley National Park, the area is filled with beautiful scenery and wildlife, and offers guests the opportunity to take a break from their hectic schedules.

When planning a visit to Saline Valley Warm Springs, there are a few things you should know. The area is only accessible by a high speed, 4WD vehicle. Cell phone reception is spotty at best, so plan accordingly.

In addition to a 4WD vehicle, you’ll want to bring along some spare tires, as the back roads can be quite bumpy. High clearance vehicles are highly recommended, as well as good tires. If you have a flat tire, there is no tow truck in the area, so you’ll need to be prepared.

When you arrive at the springs, you’ll be greeted with public nudity and a few pit toilets – a reminder of the area’s days in the early 1900s. While the springs are a great place to relax, you’ll want to make sure you’re aware of the current conditions. The roads can be quite washboard, so you’ll want to take your time and enjoy the journey. There is also a landing strip, also known as a “chicken strip,” which is available for private planes.

In the winter months, you can expect to encounter heavy snows and strong winds. Be sure to come prepared with warm clothing and supplies, as temperatures can drop quickly.

When planning your visit to Saline Valley Warm Springs, you’ll want to make sure you’re aware of the area’s unique features and conditions. Be sure to dress appropriately and bring along spare tires and other supplies. While you may not have the same experience as Charles Manson did in the late 1960s, you’re sure to have a great time in this unique and beautiful area.

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Local information

Address: South Warm Springs Road, Death Valley National Park, Death Valley, California 92328
GPS: 36.812879,-117.766125
Season: Year-round
Clothing: Optional
Website: nps.gov/deva/learn/news/saline-valley-warm-springs-plan-finalized.htm

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